Musee de la Mode et du Textile in Paris



The museum is part of Les Arts Decoratifs, which is located at the Louvre Palace where you can discover collections of textiles such as silks and embroideries, along with costumes that trace the history of dress and design from the regency period to the present day.

Beginnings of the Musee de la Mode et du Textile



The collection of textiles originally belonged to the Union Centrale des Arts Decoratifs and the Musee des Arts Decoratifs first opened back in 1905 with a major collection of textiles such as silks, embroideries, lace, tapestries, etc.
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Corps a baleine
Then in 1948, under the initiative of Francois Boucher who was a costume historian, the Union Francaise des Arts du Costume, or UFAC for short, was founded with the idea of setting up a museum dedicated to costume and period clothing.

It was under the direction of the curator, Yvonne Deslandres, with her direction and energy, that the UFAC over the years became home to one of the largest collections of costumes in the world.

Then in 1981 the Union Centrale des Arts Decoratifs and the Union Francaise des Arts du Costume came to an agreement in which to join forces to create the Musee des Arts de la Mode, however, it took a further five years before this museum was open to the public within the Pavilion de Marsan in the Louvre Palace.
The collections and exhibition galleries were then transferred to the Rohan wing of The Louvre in 1997 and spread over two floors, they provided much needed additional space for the impressive collection.

About Musee de la Mode et du Textile Museum Today



Today, still located within the Rohan wing of The Louvre split over two levels, there is around 1500 metres squared of exhibition space, which makes up the part of the Musee de la Mode et du Textile, or Museum of the Costume and of Textile in English, that you can visit.

Here you will be able to discover innovations in textiles from the 7th century onwards along with tracing the history of costume from the Regency period right through to the present day.
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Sac a main France
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Robe a la francaise
The collections of the Musee de la Mode et du Textile rival the largest collections in the world like the Musee Galliera in Paris, which was formerly known as the Musee de la Mode de la Ville de Paris, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Metropolitan museum in New York.

Incredibly this museum in Paris now holds around 16,000 costumes, 35,000 fashion accessories and around 30,000 textiles, which are continually growing.  Although, as you can no doubt appreciate, these are not all on display at any one time, so as well as the permanent collections, temporary exhibitions on different themes are also held, meaning there is always something new to discover while you are on holiday in Paris.

Not forgetting that the Les Arts Decoratifs is also linked with the restaurant formerly called Le Saut du Loup and now renamed LouLou, which can be found within this area of the Louvre Palace and is accessed via the museums.  So this is an ideal place to relax in a unique setting overlooking the Jardin du Carrousel of the Tuileries Gardens before continuing your sightseeing.
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Chapeau Esther Meyer

Visiting Musee de la Mode et du Textile in Paris



As of 2018, a combined ticket to visit this museum along with the Musee des Arts Decoratifs and the Musee de la Publicite is a cost of €11.  Alternatively you can also opt for a ticket, which incorporates you being able to visit the Musee Nissim de Camondo that is located in the 8th Arrondissement as well for only €15 and audioguides are also included in the discounted price.

There is a complete ticket referred to as MAD Pass, which is valid for 4 days and includes the cost of entry to all the museums of the Musee des Arts Decoratifs, the Musee Nissim de Camondo and the temporary exhibition held within the Nave along with audioguides.

However, for those that are disabled with a carer, you can gain free entry upon proof and the disabled access to the museums is via a lift at 105 Rue de Rivoli.  People under the age 18 along with those that are under 26 who are EU residents can also gain free entry to the museum, in addition to students of the Ateliers du Carrousel.
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Habit a la francaise
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Robe en deux parties

Access to the Musee de la Mode et du Textile



When it comes to travelling to the Rue de Rivoli museums and the famous Musee du Louvre, which are located in the 1st Arrondissement close to the River Seine, there are numerous different forms of public transport in Paris available.

To start with, you have the Metro stations called the Palais Royal - Musee du Louvre, which is the nearest stop and is accessed via lines 1 and 7.  Then you have the Tuileries stop or the Louvre-Rivoli stop via line 1, the Pyramides stop via lines 7 and 14 or the Concorde stop, which serves lines 1, 8 and 12.

By bus you would need one of the bus lines 21, 24, 27, 39, 42, 48, 58, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 81, 84, 85 and 95 or the Noctilien Night Bus Service via lines N01, N11, N12, N13, N15, N16 and N24, which will all get you within walking distance of the Museum of the Costume and of Textile and numerous other tourist attractions in Paris.
Musee de la Mode et du Textile Paire de chaussures portees
Alternatively, there is also the Batobus, which is the water bus that travels up and down the River Seine and has a dedicated stop opposite the Musee du Louvre, not forgetting the tours in Paris like the open topped double decker l’OpenTour buses plus there are also Velib stations for the self service bike hire scheme located nearby as well.

However, if you have you own vehicle, then you may be pleased to know that there is a car park at the Carrousel du Louvre on the Rue des Pyramides, which is only a short walk away from the Musee de la Mode et du Textile, but bear in mind there are height restrictions and different costs depending upon how long you wish to stay.