|     Home Page     |     Tourist Attractions In Paris     |     Museums In Paris     |     Entertainment In Paris     |     Restaurants In Paris     |     Paris Images      |
________________________

Main Index Pages

Index - Home Page
Photos Images Of Paris
Tourist Information Map Of Paris
Tourist Information Map Of France
Map Of Campsites in France
Travel Guides And Information
Video Library

Forum Index
  -  Latest News
________________________

Travel Guides And Tourist Information On Paris

Holiday In Paris
Camping Holiday In Paris
Camping Holiday In Ile de France
Campsites Near Paris
Tourist Map Of Paris
Transport In Paris
Tours In Paris
Tourist Attractions In Paris
  -  The Eiffel Tower
  -  The Arc de Triomphe
  -  Avenue des Champs Elysees
Monuments In Paris
Landmarks In Paris
  -  River Seine
  -  The Sacre Coeur Basilica
French Museums In Paris
  -  The Musee du Louvre
  -  The Musee d'Orsay
History Of Paris
  -  History of the Eiffel Tower
  -  The Tomb of Napoleon I
Churches In Paris
Gardens And Parks In Paris
Squares In Paris
Fountains In Paris
Entertainment In Paris
Theatres And Opera Houses
Music Venues And Concerts In Paris
Shows In Paris
Circuses In Paris
Cabarets In Paris
Night Clubs In Paris
Bars In Paris
Restaurants In Paris
Top And Gourmet Restaurants
________________________

Information Pages

Emergency Number 112
EHIC European Health Insurance Card
Travel Documents You Need
French National Holidays In France
Driving In France
French Food
Delicacies
Linking To Our Site
Contact Us
________________________

The above speed limits are for private cars even if towing a caravan providing that the total gross weight of the whole outfit is less that 3,500kg.  If you are above that weight, then the speed limit is reduced as you are classed as a heavy goods vehicle.  For example, the maximum speed on a motorway is 110km per hour and again this is reduced down in bad weather conditions.

Do make sure you watch your speed!  If you are stopped for speeding you can be fined on the spot and the fines have to be paid in cash there and then, which can be quite expensive.  If you cannot pay or you are travelling more than 25km/h above the speed limit, then your car can be impounded and you could end up with a very hefty fine or even lose your licence.

Be very careful, especially when on the toll roads as the time from entering and leaving is calculated as you go to pay and you do not want your camping holiday in France to come to an abrupt end!

The French Government do publish information on exactly where speed traps are located and this is one of the reasons why it is illegal to have a radar detector fitted to your vehicle and even if you have a Sat Nav system with this capability you must not have it turned on.  You could end up with yet another hefty fine.

Zebra Crossings

Yes you will see lots of zebra crossings, especially in towns!

You must always stop at a zebra crossing when someone wishes to cross, which is enforced by law and in fact many people just step out expecting you to stop.  However, as a pedestrian you should always be very careful, as the French do not seem to obey this rule as much as they should!

La Priorité à Droite

You will no doubt come across the term La Priorité à Droite at some point on your travels, which basically means that the vehicle coming onto a road has priority from the right.  This is even the case when a minor road is entering a main road, so do be careful, especially when in the towns and villages as you would need to give way, even if it is you on the main road.

Officially this rule no longer applies unless clearly sign posted yet it still causes confusion and in Paris it is still widely practised.  So you could end up feeling like you are being cut up, even though this may have been how the French were taught to drive when the Priorité à Droite rule was still widely used!

Overtaking and Passing on Narrow Roads

If you see a solid single line or a double solid line then you are not allowed to overtake, but if you do and you are caught out, then the penalties are severe!

When you are on a narrow road  or going down a steep gradient then there are regulations you would have to abide by.  For obvious reasons, if you are towing, then the other person that is not would have to reverse.  However, if you are not towing, then it is the smaller or lower weight vehicle that has to reverse.

Flashing your lights are a way of saying I have the right of way or looking to pass another vehicle, which is something you will notice quite frequently on the motorways as mentioned above.

If you are towing and on a road that has three lanes or more, then you can only use the two right hand lanes, similar to the rules within the uk and therefore you cannot use the third lane to overtake.

Parking

It is illegal to spend a night on the roadside with your caravan.

When it comes to parking, obviously every area is different, but as a general rule, parking on a street is limited to two hours.  Many places are pay and display, although in Paris you do need to have a credit or prepaid card to park, rather than putting cash into a meter.

Stopping on the left hand side of the road is prohibited unless it is a one way street and normally if you see a yellow line (s) on the road side (just like in the UK) then you are not allowed to park.

Now when it comes to disabled parking this is very different from the UK.
You still cannot park on yellow lines, no waiting zones, etc and even if in a designated disabled area within a car park, you will find that you still have to pay the same fee as everyone else.

But by planning your camping holiday in France prior to travelling will give you more peace of mind and with these few general rules out of the way, just enjoy the experience, the beautiful scenery, the French wine and food and have a great family vacation at one of the many lovely French campsites.

However, please do bear in mind that driving regulations can change all the time and these are a general guide, so it would be advisable to always check everything in detail prior to your journey abroad.

Traffic Lights

The traffic lights in France are quite different from the UK and you will often find these positioned high overhead, which does take a bit of getting used to.

There is also no amber light after the red light as it just goes straight to green, however, if you see an amber light that is flashing, it means that you can still go ahead, but you must give way to any vehicles coming from the right.

If you see a red flashing light it means no entry and this is also the same for things such as level crossings.
Toll Roads

There are quite a lot of toll roads in France, which are actually most of the main motorways and the prices of each toll will vary depending upon the distance you have travelled on it and the type of vehicle.

When coming up towards a toll road you will see a sign stating Péage.  Upon reaching the exit of a toll, you will come up to lots of booths and you need one that shows green, but that is also manned for ease, however, do bear in mind that all tickets and booths are located on the left hand side, so if you are in a right hand drive car, then it is the passenger that has to deal with these.

The maximum time you can stay within a toll is normally 24 hours, but some are 48 hours and this will be shown on the ticket you get at the start of the toll.

The laybys and service stations on these roads, which are known as Aires, are of excellent quality and are great places to have a short break.  All will have toilet facilities and many have picnic areas and childrens play areas as well.

However, it is not advisable to stop overnight on one of these for security reasons as they do tend to be target areas for thieves, which is something we found out to our horror!  Always leave the motorway and find a campsite or plan and book a specific campsite in France to stop at, prior to your journey.

There are also toll bridges in France and one that many of you will have heard of is called the Millau Viaduct, where, again you have to pay a fee for travelling over it and this does depend on what vehicle you have or if you are towing, etc.

We hope that this article has helped you, but an obvious thing is remember to drive on the right hand side of the road and go round the roundabouts to the right, also always make sure you give way to traffic already on a roundabout.

So now you can just enjoy your camping holiday in France once you reach your destination safely.

However, please do bear in mind that driving regulations can change and these are a general guide, so it would be advisable to check everything in detail prior to your journey abroad.

Related Information:

  -  General Regulations for Driving in France
  -  EHIC European Health Insurance Cards For Holidays In Europe
  -  Travel Documents You Need For Holidays in France and Europe






Copyright © www.eutouring.com All Rights Reserved



Eutouring.com Paris Header Image
French Roads
Milau Viaduct In France
Sign Post Beside A French Road
A Road In France
Sign Post To A Layby In France
Cars On A Toll Road In France
French Road In The Countryside

The French roads and driving in France



Some helpful driving tips and guidelines for the French roads in France to hopefully keep you out of trouble, when touring, and make your camping holiday in France that more enjoyable.

French Road Speed Limits

The speed limits are different from the UK and are actually slightly faster, but these are also always shown in kilometres rather than miles per hour.

The speed limits on motorways are 130km per hour, but this is reduced in bad weather down to 110km per hour.

A duel carriageway is 110km per hour and main roads are 90km per hour, with the periphery being 80km per hour.  But in bad weather the same rule as a motorway applies, where the speed limit is reduced.

In towns and on minor roads there is a maximum of 50km per hour, although you will find that some roads posted at lower speeds.

The above speed limits are for private cars even if towing a caravan providing that the stated total gross weight of the whole outfit is less than 3,500kg.  If you are above that weight, then the speed limit is reduced as you are classed as a heavy goods vehicle.  For example, the maximum speed on a motorway is 90km per hour and again this is reduced down in bad weather conditions.